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Faculty Detail    
Name JEREMY J. DAY
 
Campus Address SHEL 910 Zip 2182
Phone  (20-5) -960
E-mail  jjday@uab.edu
Other websites Lab Website
     

Education
Undergraduate  Auburn University    2003  B.A. 
Graduate  University of North Carolina    2009  Ph.D. 
Fellowship  University of Alabama at Birmingham    2014  n/a 


Faculty Appointment(s)
Appointment Type Department Division Rank
Primary  Neurobiology  Neurobiology Associate Professor
Secondary  Cell, Developmntl, & Integrative Biology  Cell, Developmntl, & Integrative Biology Associate Professor
Secondary  Genetics   Genetics Chair Office Associate Professor
Secondary  Psychiatry   Psych - Behavioral Neurobiology Associate Professor
Secondary  Psychology  Psychology Associate Professor
Center  Neurology   Alzheimer's Disease Center Associate Professor
Center  Civitan International Research Center  Civitan International Research Center Associate Professor
Center  General Clinical Research Center  Comprehensive Neuroscience Center Associate Professor
Center  General Clinical Research Center  Ctr for Clinical & Translational Sci Associate Professor
Center  Neurology   Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute Associate Professor

Graduate Biomedical Sciences Affiliations
Cell, Molecular, & Developmental Biology 
Comprehensive Neuroscience Center 
Genetics, Genomics and Bioinformatics 
Neuroscience 
Neuroscience Graduate Program 
Social & Behavioral Sciences 

Biographical Sketch 
Dr. Day is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at UAB. Dr. Day received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, conducted postdoctoral training at UAB, and joined the faculty at UAB in 2014. His lab explores the relationship between epigenetic states and neuronal function, with an emphasis on the brain circuits that regulate motivated behavior.



Research/Clinical Interest
Title
Neurobiology of motivated and learned behaviors
Description
Our goal is to understand how experience alters the brain, and how those changes drive future behaviors. We approach this broad topic at diverse levels of analysis that integrate molecular, genetic, and epigenetic tools with techniques that probe the function of single neurons and entire neuronal circuits.

Keywords
Epigenetics, addiction, memory, molecular mechanisms, optogenetics